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Letter: Seniority is not a reason to elevate a candidate above the competition

Published: Tuesday, June 12 2012 12:00 a.m. MDT

Senator Orrin Hatch speaks at the Utah Republican Party 2012 nominating convention at the South Towne Exposition Center in Sandy on April 21, 2012. With 59.19 percent of the vote, Hatch fell just shy of winning the Republican nomination outright at the state GOP convention. Delegates gave Dan Liljenquist 40.81 percent of the vote in the second round of balloting.

Laura Seitz, Deseret News

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The re-elect Hatch mailer I just received could only give one reason to vote for him: the chance to become Senate Finance Chairman. Inside was shown "conservative ratings" published by the American Conservative Union that showed the ratings from all the past chairmen with Sen. Hatch being the highest at 90 percent.

This is the whole truth: If Dan Liljenquist is elected over Hatch, then talented, BYU educated, Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo is next in line for the position, and his conservative rating comes in higher at 92.82 percent.

There is no reason for Utah voters to give any value to this "seniority." In fact, the word appears nowhere in the U.S. Constitution. The call for term limits would be greatly reduced if those elected to the House and Senate would cast their votes for key positions without taking seniority into consideration at all.

Timothy Tate

Bountiful

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