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Is your child's temperament a good fit with yours?

By Beth J. Harpaz

Associated Press

Published: Wednesday, May 2 2012 12:40 p.m. MDT

NEW YORK — It's a concept that parents may not be familiar with, but experts say it can explain a lot about family conflicts: Is your child's temperament a good "fit" with yours?

For example, a stubborn child who's a chip off the old block might have a lot of showdowns with an equally stubborn mom or dad. But contrasting temperaments don't necessarily assure good results: A determined child might overwhelm an overly flexible parent.

Many personality traits like these are inborn, but "temperaments can also be colored by the environment in which children are raised," said child psychologist Brian Daly, who teaches at Drexel University in Philadelphia.

That means parents who take a step back to consider their child's personality traits may be able to tailor their childrearing style to deal more effectively with problems.

Much of the research on child temperament is based on the New York Longitudinal Study, in which psychiatrists Alexander Thomas and Stella Chess followed a group of children from birth to adulthood beginning in 1956. Thomas and Chess, who were married, found that children's personalities could be put in three basic categories: easy, difficult, and slow to warm up. They also identified nine other variables that measured behaviors and traits like willfulness, moodiness, activity levels, distractibility, attention span, and regularity in sleep, hunger and other biological functions.

One finding from their research was that a good "fit" between children and parents results when adult expectations, values and demands are in accord with a child's natural capacities and behaviors. Their last book, published in 1999, was called "Goodness of Fit." (Thomas died in 2003, Chess died in 2007.)

But their theory was not just a way of letting parents off the hook by blaming kids for personality traits they could not control. The takeaway for parents was that conflicts resulting from a poor fit between parent and child might be ameliorated if childrearing practices could be changed. The theory has withstood the test of time, with psychologists and other experts who work with children and parents still using some of these concepts today.

Resa Fogel, a psychologist who practices in Montclair and Teaneck, N.J., was one of the children in the original study. "When I was little, they came to my house all the time and interviewed and watched me," said Fogel. "They were the nicest people. I thought they were another set of grandparents."

She became interested in psychology, an interest that was fueled when she got a job assisting Thomas in his research at New York University. She used some of the original studies for her dissertation, which looked at how children with difficult temperaments end up behaving.

"You would think people with difficult temperaments are automatically very hard people to be around," she said. "I showed that if there's a goodness of fit between the environment and the person, then even if you have a difficult temperament, you're not going to necessarily misbehave. In other words, there's hope for people who are tough."

Difficult children "are going to be harder" for parents, she acknowledged, "but you have to have the right way of handling it. That's what goodness of fit is. It's like a puzzle you put together."

Arthur Robin, director of psychology training at the Children's Hospital of Michigan in Detroit, said one common problem he encounters is a child with ADHD or "a very hyper-impulsive child" who has "a passive, depressed, lethargic mom. The child is going to get to do anything he or she likes because the mom is not going to have the energy level to set down some structure."

Another common problem is "a very rigid, willful child and a highly flexible parent," Robin said. "The parent is going to go with whatever the child wants. The child is going to end up really spoiled or have a strong sense of entitlement."

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