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Picturing history: Boggs home site

Published: Wednesday, April 25 2012 5:00 a.m. MDT

When the missionaries to the Native Americans arrived in Independence, Mo., Oliver Cowdery, Parley P. Pratt and Frederick G. Williams crossed the western boundary of Missouri into Indian lands to preach the gospel. The street sign, right, identifies one place where they preached. According to Max H. Parkin, it is the site of the Shawnee Indian camp near the Kansas River. in the present-day Kansas City, Kan., area. Ziba Peterson and Peter Whitmer Jr. stayed in Independence to earn needed money. Whitmer found employment as a tailor boarding in a home situated where the brick building, above, now stands. The owner was Lilburn W. Boggs. When Boggs was later elected lieutenant governor of the state, Peter Whitmer Jr. made him a new suit of clothes. Boggs would issue the ?Extermination Order? in 1838, driving the Latter-day Saints from Missouri.

Kenneth Mays,

When Mormon missionaries to the Native Americans arrived in Independence, Mo., Oliver Cowdery, Parley P. Pratt and Frederick G. Williams crossed the western boundary of Missouri into Indian lands to preach the gospel.

The street sign identifies one place where they preached. According to Max H. Parkin, it is the site of the Shawnee Indian camp near the Kansas River. The Shawnee camp was at Turner, in the present-day Kansas City, Kan., area.

Ziba Peterson and Peter Whitmer Jr. stayed in Independence to earn needed money. Whitmer found employment as a tailor boarding in a home situated where the brick building now stands.

The owner was Lilburn W. Boggs.

When Boggs was later elected lieutenant governor of the state, Peter Whitmer Jr. made him a new suit of clothes. Boggs would issue the "Extermination Order" in 1838, driving members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from Missouri.

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