Heavy rain in East, April snow for some

Associated Press

Published: Sunday, April 22 2012 10:13 p.m. MDT

A woman fishes on the West Branch of the AuSable River in Wilmington, N.Y., after a snowfall on Sunday, April 22, 2012. A spring nor'easter along the East Coast on Sunday is expected to bring rain and heavy winds and even snow in some places as it strengthens into early Monday, a punctuation to a relatively dry stretch of weather for the Northeast. (AP Photo/Adirondack Daily Enterprise, Mike Lynch)2012. A spring nor'easter along the East Coast on Sunday is expected to bring rain and heavy winds and even snow in some places as it strengthens into early Monday, a punctuation to a relatively dry stretch of weather for the Northeast. (AP Photo/Adirondack Daily Enterprise, Mike Lynch)

Associated Press

NEW YORK — A spring nor'easter rumbled along the East Coast on Sunday and was expected to bring rain and heavy winds and even snow in some places as it strengthens into early this morning, a punctuation to a relatively dry stretch of weather for the Northeast.

The storm is atypical for April but not uncommon, said David Stark, a National Weather Service meteorologist in New York City, where 2½ to 3½ inches of rain are expected in the city, along with wind gusts of 25-30 mph.

With the storm came a spate of disruptions. Pro baseball games were postponed in New York and Washington. The space shuttle Enterprise's scheduled arrival in New York City was pushed back. An Earth Day celebration at a park in Virginia Beach, Va., was canceled.

From Philadelphia north through New York City and into southern New England, up to 4 inches of rain could fall, with the heaviest downpour expected early today.

Some higher-elevation areas in the western parts of Pennsylvania and New York and in West Virginia and Ohio could even see snow. Forecasts called for 4 to 12 inches.

Flooding was possible in some areas, but precipitation in much of the Northeast is below normal for this time of year.

"We're down 7 or 8 inches," said weather service forecaster Charlie Foley. "This won't completely wipe out the deficit, but it will certainly help."

Even Lake Champlain on the Vermont-New York border, normally close to flood stage this time of year because of rain and snowmelt, is near a record low. Just a year ago, it approached its highest level on record.

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