'Biggest Loser' weight-loss mentality could pose serious health risks

By Kyle Hunt

ksl.com Contributor

Published: Thursday, Feb. 23 2012 12:35 p.m. MST

Kaylee Kinikini of Shelley, Idaho, Denise Hill, of Bountiful, Utah, and Sarah Nitta, right, of Las Vegas, were contestants in Season 11 of NBC's "The Biggest Loser."

Provided by NBC

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In the eyes of millions of Americans, "The Biggest Loser" television show conveys an accurate depiction of reality.

Since its arrival on the NBC network in 2004, the show has provided an avenue for viewers to relate to teens, house moms and senior citizens who, like themselves, desire a more proactive approach to weight loss.

In an episode-by-episode chronology, at-home audience members are inspired as they follow contestants who take on the battle of obesity that currently plagues more than 35.7 percent of adults and 16.9 percent of children, according to data gathered by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and published by the Journal of the American Medical Association in January 2012.

See the full story at KSL.com.

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