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Triumph, tragedy dominate Grammy Awards

By David Bauder

Associated Press

Published: Monday, Feb. 13 2012 5:02 a.m. MST

As for the subject of "21," she said, "I think he'll be very happy for me."

Dan Wilson, who co-wrote Adele's "Someone Like You" and two other tracks on the disc, said he's excited about how well Adele has done because her songs are performed simply. It's all about the message and the emotion, he said.

"She stands up onstage and delivers them with tons of soul and heart," he said. "It almost seems like a trick she's doing that. She doesn't have any, like, elephants walking with her or, you know, fire and stuff like it. It seems like she has the most amazing trick, which is she's doing it with almost nothing, and is still blowing us away."

Paul Epworth, who worked with Adele on the album, won a Grammy for producer of the year.

While Adele's vocals are powerful, the singing of best new artist winner Justin Vernon of Bon Iver is often delicate, the music atmospheric. He won a competitive and diverse category with Minaj, The Band Perry, J. Cole and Skrillex. Appearing onstage in an ill-fitting suit jacket, Vernon talked about writing for the inherent reward of writing songs, not for trophies.

It doesn't mean he wasn't honored and grateful for the award, he said backstage later.

"At some point I got really nervous," he said. "Maybe it was because I didn't feel like I deserved to be here ... This is the biggest night in music but it's also a very small Staples Center, and there's so much music out there in the world and it's so hard to feel like it's collecting the whole thing."

He gave an onstage shout-out to Eau Claire, Wis., probably a Grammy first.

Grohl shouted "long live rock 'n' roll" as producers played LMFAO's "Party Rock" over the loudspeakers to get him offstage after the Foo Fighters won for best rock performance. He made a plea for musicians to recognize that the human element is what makes their art most important.

"It's not about being perfect. It's not about sounding absolutely correct. It's not about what goes on in a computer. It's about what goes on in here and what goes on in here," he said, pointing to his head and his heart.

Online: http://www.grammys.com

Associated Press writers Nekesa Mumbi Moody, Beth Harris, Sandy Cohen and Mesfin Fekadu contributed to this report.

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