Book review: 'Sudden Peril' full of intrigue and suspense

By Rosemarie Howard

For the Deseret News

Published: Tuesday, Oct. 4 2011 5:00 a.m. MDT

"SUDDEN PERIL: Inside the War Against Evil," by Frank Richardson, Bonneville Books, $15.99, 246 pages (f)

Frank Richardson’s “Sudden Peril,” is an intriguing, fast-paced novel full of spies, patriots and deadly international intrigue — with a Mormon twist.

Led by D. Jeffrey Gordon, a group of patriots form the Freeman Foundation, an organization committed to ferreting out and reporting secret organizations seeking to destroy liberty. Although patriots of any religion are welcome to join the Freeman Foundation, it currently consists of members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

When the CEO of one of these secret organizations, Canadian-based Fletchner International, discovers they are on his trail, he vows to destroy the fledgling organization.

Several subplots are skillfully woven together — Jamie Madero, a teenage summer intern for Freeman Foundation, does some quick growing up; Sarah Rudman and Chad Rowley, veterans of the organization, provide adventure and a healthy bit of romance; and a power struggle between Julienne Rosterter, chief of security, and her subordinate, Art Warnock, comes to a deadly conclusion.

Chapters are short and cut from one scene to the next cinematically. The story weaves its way from New York to the western U.S. and Canada, and flows freely back and forth from the Freeman Foundation activities to Fletchner International intrigue.

Physical violence including beatings, shooting and killing are part of the story. Mercenaries and hired guns are merciless as they go after their targets.

Full-time missionaries, as well as direct quotes from the Book of Mormon, are included in ways that accurately reflect LDS Church teachings and fit well in the context of the story. Although there are references to the LDS Church and its doctrine, the book is easily accessible to readers unfamiliar with the church.

Ten discussion questions are included that encourage thoughtful consideration of the book’s content. For example: “What do we learn from this story about the risks of confronting evil?”

The story’s conclusion leaves the door open for a sequel.

Rosemarie Howard currently lives in a 100-year old house on Main Street, Springville. Her website is at www.dramaticdimensions.com.

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