Deuce Lutui is a warrior for his team, family and faith

Published: Monday, Dec. 27 2010 5:00 a.m. MST

It's a personal choice, Sikahema said.

"Who among us, if we had a child in the NFL or NBA, would not attend their games? But that is their way of honoring Deuce. They feel it will bless and prolong his career," Sikahema said. "It speaks volumes of the kind of home he grew up in."

Starting in high school, a father's priesthood blessing was essential at the beginning of each season. When Lutui arrived at training camp in Flagstaff, Ariz., last August, he missed his father dearly and desired a blessing. He began knocking on dorm doors and finally found former BYU quarterback Max Hall on the fourth floor eating a sandwich. Lutui said the rookie quarterback was happy to give a blessing.

"It was my first blessing away from my father, and it was powerful. I felt my father's presence," Lutui said with emotion. "I'll never forget it."

Life is good

Despite the Cardinals' current losing season, Deuce Lutui is happy with his life.

This past July he finally became a U.S. citizen.

He and Hall were recently invited to switch on the Christmas lights at the Mesa Arizona Temple gardens, an honor in the community.

Back at Fred Taukei'aho's Sports Grill & Drive on Main Street in Manti, Utah, six miles from where Lutui played at Snow College, there is a popular item on the menu called the "Deuce Burger."

Lutui has also made a personal inner commitment to become T-B-O-L-I-T-N-F-L, which stands for "The Best Offensive Lineman In The NFL," and his story is inspiring others.

As long as Deuce Lutui can, he will continue to play football like a warrior, bring honor to his family and be a missionary for the church.

"I just want to bear witness of Jesus Christ, that he lives," he said, repeating the words he told news media at the Easter pageant. "If more people can bear record and have faith in him, this world would be such a better place."

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