Quantcast

Emily W. Jensen: Non-Christmas Bloggernacle posts from History of Jell-O and Mormons to the FamilySearch Bloginar

Published: Tuesday, Dec. 14 2010 5:00 a.m. MST

Cards and crafts. Food and fun. The Bloggernacle is full of creative ideas for your Christmas celebration. ... We interrupt this Christmas column to bring you some breaking blog posts.

My plan for another Christmas-themed column went out the window when I saw the following blogs covering such questions as “Can you recognize a Mormon by his/her face?” and “When did Jell-o first start in Mormon cuisine?” and even “What Mormon books are coming out next year?”  Plus, you are invited to FamilySearch’s online 2010 Bloginar!

Mormon faces: Have you ever wondered if people really can pick out Mormons by looking at their faces? From a new study released by researchers the University of Toronto and Tufts University, the answer is “Yes” — although the differences are subtle. Click to read more about our “Healthy Recognizably Mormon Faces.”

Jell-O traced: It is, as one commenter exclaims, “an important breakthrough in Mormon studies!” Ardis E. Parshall, after extensive research, has discovered the “Birth of a Mormon Tradition: Jello” to be, drumroll please, all the way back to 1898, with the printing of a recipe in the "The Young Women’s Journal" for Orange Jelly. Wow! She also includes some other fun, and um interesting, recipes for other Jell-O concoctions found in other periodicals. Click to learn more about this traditionally Mormon food.

Forthcoming books: Jared T has put together an extensive list of “Recently Published and Forthcoming Books on Mormon History, 2010 Edition. Subjects include Mormons in medicine, Hollywood in Utah, the Temple Lot, revelations, prophet biographies and much, much more! Mormon scholars will rejoice at many of the offerings to come. 

FamilySearch Bloginar: I am pleased to pass on this e-mail invitation from the FamilySearch Public Affairs Manager: “Join us Online December 15th for FamilySearch’s December 2010 Bloginar! This free, informational bloginar will cover the latest FamilySearch news and include a demonstration of the November and December upgrades to the new beta search engine — all in preparation to launch the next generation FamilySearch.org. Who should attend? Any news writer, genealogy media professional or blogger interested in the latest FamilySearch updates or current developments for their readers.” So mark your calendars for Wednesday, Dec. 15, from noon to 1:15 p.m. And to join the meeting online, click here and use this passcode: 948178.

Now let’s find other blog moments from this last week in the Bloggernacle:  

Power pick: Ah, this sweet duet of “My Heavenly Father Loves Me” from two missionaries is a beautiful reminder of our many blessings. 

Quotable comment: “I went to Barnes and Noble here in Minnesota last week and was struck by the sight of the 'Great Reads for Christmas!' display in the teen section: Condie’s Matched, the second installment in Dashner’s Maze Runner series, Orson Scott Card’s new YA title, Pathfinder, and a box set of the Twilight books. A bunch-o-Mormons, all in a row. I was tempted to take a picture with my cell phone. Perhaps I should have.” — Angela H. commenting on the release of "Matched" and wondering if LDS author Ally Condie is following “In the footsteps of Stephenie Meyer.” 

Techie tip: Church members often do not understand the importance of copyright issues, both in protecting their own work and also the work of others, especially when it comes to fulfilling callings. This blog features a recent presentation on the importance of “Being Copyrighteous.” For instance, “The church cautions us: ‘Church members should strictly observe all copyright laws. Generally, only copyright owners may authorize duplication (copying), distribution, public performance, public display, or derivatives of their work. Using a work in any of these ways without authorization from the copyright owner is contrary to Church policy and may also subject the Church or the user to legal liability.” Click to find out more about this important, yet sometimes overlooked, issue.

 

Get The Deseret News Everywhere

Subscribe

Mobile

RSS