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Multi-media: Islamic festival

Published: Tuesday, Dec. 9 2008 12:09 a.m. MST

Hundreds attend a prayer service hosted by the Utah Islamic Center to commemorate Eid-ul-Adha, "Festival of Sacrifice," the scriptural account of God's command for Abraham to sacrifice his firstborn son, Ishmael. According to scripture, God intervened as Abraham was about to sacrifice his son and provided him with a lamb to sacrifice instead. Eid-ul-Adha also involves the sacrificing of an animal (typically a goat or a lamb), by Muslims who have the means to do so, to celebrate Abraham's obedience. The meat is then shared with family, friends and less fortunate members of the community. Eid-ul-Adha is the second of two great festivals Muslims celebrate annually; the first is Eid-ul-Fitr, which follows the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

Courtney Sargent, Deseret News

Hundreds attend a prayer service hosted by the Utah Islamic Center to commemorate Eid-ul-Adha, "Festival of Sacrifice," the scriptural account of God's command for Abraham to sacrifice his firstborn son, Ishmael. According to scripture, God intervened as Abraham was about to sacrifice his son and provided him with a lamb to sacrifice instead. Eid-ul-Adha also involves the sacrificing of an animal (typically a goat or a lamb), by Muslims who have the means to do so, to celebrate Abraham's obedience. The meat is then shared with family, friends and less fortunate members of the community. Eid-ul-Adha is the second of two great festivals Muslims celebrate annually; the first is Eid-ul-Fitr, which follows the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

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