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Romney pressing reset after SC loss

By Kasie Hunt

Associated Press

Published: Sunday, Jan. 22 2012 5:36 p.m. MST

Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, campaigns at Allstar Building Materials in Ormond Beach, Fla., Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012.

Charles Dharapak, Associated Press

ORMOND BEACH, Fla. — Mitt Romney is pressing reset.

After a crushing loss to Newt Gingrich in South Carolina, the former Massachusetts governor made clear Sunday that he plans to attack his chief rival's character, release his tax returns this week and try to right a campaign he acknowledged had been knocked off kilter.

"It was not a great week for me," Romney acknowledged during an interview on "Fox News Sunday."

And at a rally here, his first event in Florida after the loss to Gingrich, Romney assailed the former speaker's leadership abilities. "We're not choosing a talk show host, alright?" he said. "We're choosing a leader."

Romney now turns to Florida at what is possibly the most critical moment of his campaign, after two weeks of sustained attacks from his opponents and a series of self-inflicted errors that erased any notion that he would be able to lock up the nomination quickly by winning this state's Jan. 31 primary.

"I'm looking forward to a long campaign," Romney said on Fox News. "We are selecting the president of the United States. Someone who is going to face ups and downs and real challenges, and I hope that through this process, I can demonstrate that I can take a setback and come back strong."

Even if Romney does manage a victory here — his Florida campaign is by far the strongest of any in the GOP field, and he and his allies have been alone on the air for weeks — the race has become a two-way fight between him and Gingrich, the former House speaker with a huge dose of momentum.

And now Romney's team is girding for a long and costly fight that extends well beyond Florida. Saturday night's shellacking in South Carolina underscored the former Massachusetts governor's vulnerabilities and undermined his claims of becoming the inevitable Republican nominee.

Over the next 10 days, the candidates — including former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum and Texas Rep. Ron Paul — will meet twice on the debate stage, a venue where Gingrich has thrived in recent weeks and Romney has struggled some when pressed about questions about his wealth and private business experience. The debates — Monday in Tampa and Thursday in Jacksonville — present fresh opportunities for both breakout performances and mistakes.

Romney brought out his more aggressive posture and lines of attack toward Gingrich at the Sunday rally. "Speaker Gingrich has also been a leader. At the end of four years, it was proven that he was a failed leader," Romney said, referring to the ethics investigation that resulted in a rare reprimand for a House speaker.

It's clear the campaign is worried voters have forgotten Gingrich's history. "He had to resign in disgrace. I don't know whether you knew that," Romney said.

"I'm asking the people of Florida to consider: what are the qualities of leadership?" he said. "What makes an effective president, a great president, even? Ronald Reagan, Dwight Eisenhower and FDR, even?"

It was an angrier, more aggressive Romney who took the stage at the rally here. He shouted back and forth with the crowd after Occupy Wall Street hecklers interrupted him and rattled off a list of leadership qualities, drawing cheers after each, in a rare back-and-forth with the crowd.

Romney attacked Gingrich's time working for the quasi-government mortgage giant Freddie Mac, calling again for him to release records related to his consulting work for them.

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