Poll: Republicans shrug at Romney's business past

By Nancy Benac

Associated Press

Published: Wednesday, Dec. 14 2011 1:00 a.m. MST

FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2011 file photo, Republican presidential candidate former House Speaker Newt Gingrich gestures during debate in Manchester, N.H. Gingrich is pledging to stay relentlessly positive in his quest for the White House. Except when he's not.

Elise Amendola, File, Associated Press

Enlarge photo»

WASHINGTON — Mitt Romney says his business background makes him a better presidential candidate than Newt Gingrich, who has spent decades in Washington. But the argument is not moving Republicans his way, underscoring Romney's challenge in finding a way to stem Gingrich's rise three weeks before the Iowa caucus, a new Associated Press-GfK poll finds.

Republicans are evenly divided on whether a Washington insider or outsider is best-suited to be president. That's a problem for Romney, who cites his private-sector experience as the biggest difference between the two front-runners for the GOP nomination.

The poll also found a significant drop in satisfaction with the overall field of Republicans vying to challenge President Barack Obama next year. In October, 66 percent of Republican adults were satisfied with the field, and 29 percent unsatisfied. Now, 56 percent are satisfied and 40 percent unsatisfied.

Except for four years as Massachusetts governor, Romney, 64, has spent his career in business and management. He ran unsuccessfully for the Senate in 1994 and for president in 2008.

Gingrich, 68, spent 20 years in the U.S. House, including four as speaker. Since 1998, he has had a lucrative, Washington-based career as a consultant, speaker and author.

Both men have earned millions of dollars over the years.

The AP-GfK nationwide poll of Republicans found Gingrich with an edge over Romney as the candidate they'd like to see win the nomination. However, it falls just within the poll's margin of error of plus or minus 6 percentage points.

Voter preferences in early voting states such as Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina do not necessarily match those in national polls. The Iowa caucus is Jan. 3. The New Hampshire primary is one week later.

For months, Romney has hovered at or near the top of Republican polls, while various rivals have risen and fallen. Gingrich's rise is at least as dramatic as the recent plummets of businessman Herman Cain and Texas Gov. Rick Perry.

An October AP-GfK poll of Republicans found Gingrich well behind the leading candidates, with 7 percent. Romney had 30 percent. The new poll finds Gingrich preferred by 33 percent of Republicans and Romney by 27 percent. All other candidates are in single digits.

Jonathan Luers, a software engineer from Chicago, is among those Republicans less than thrilled about the field.

"I guess I'm a little disappointed that it's been so fluid," said Luers, 52. "I was kind of hoping there would've been a more clear choice, without the quick knockdowns and everything." He said he's leaning toward Gingrich.

Romney has built his campaign largely on the argument that his business background makes him better suited for the presidency than anyone else, especially in terms of creating jobs. In a debate Saturday in Iowa, Romney struggled at first to name areas in which he and Gingrich disagree.

After citing Gingrich's support for a mining colony on the moon and changes to child labor laws, Romney said: "The real difference, I believe, is our backgrounds. I spent my life in the private sector. I understand how the economy works."

Among Republicans who say they prefer a non-Washington candidate, Romney has a modest edge over Gingrich. Gingrich has a larger advantage among those who say they prefer Washington experience in a nominee.

Among all people surveyed in the AP-GfK poll, including Democrats and independents, Romney fares better than Gingrich in head-to-head matchups with Obama. Obama and Romney are statistically even. But Obama leads Gingrich 51 percent to 42 percent.

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