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No. 24 Auburn blown out by No. 14 Georgia, 45-7

By Paul Newberry

Associated Press

Published: Saturday, Nov. 12 2011 6:50 p.m. MST

Auburn head coach Gene Chizik, right ,greets Georgia head coach Mark Richt after Georgia won 45-7 in an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011, in Athens, Ga.

David Goldman, Associated Press

ATHENS, Ga. — Say this about Auburn's latest loss: There was plenty of blame to go around.

Aaron Murray threw four touchdown passes in the first half and No. 14 Georgia romped to a 45-7 victory Saturday over the 24th-ranked Tigers, who looked nothing like the team that won the national championship a season ago.

Auburn (6-4, 4-3 Southeastern Conference) turned it over three times, gave up 304 yards on the ground and was outgained 528-195 as Georgia moved a step closer to wrapping up the SEC East.

"We got beat in every phase of the game you could get beat in," coach Gene Chizik said. "I didn't feel like we blocked anybody offensively all night, whether it was pass protecting or running the ball. On defense, I didn't feel like we covered many people all night. We had a hard time stopping the run. And we turned the ball over.

"That's why we got beat 45-7."

Georgia (8-2, 6-1) won its eighth in a row with a dominating performance in the Deep South's oldest rivalry, racing to a 35-7 halftime lead and finishing with its biggest win in the series since a 41-0 triumph in 1946.

After the final seconds ticked off, a Georgia player flung his helmet in the air and took off toward the student section, waving his arms. At the other end of Sanford Stadium, the band played and the red-clad fans chanted "SEC! SEC! SEC!"

The Bulldogs can clinch the East with a win over Kentucky between the hedges, which would send them to an expected matchup with No. 1 LSU right down the road at the Georgia Dome.

"We feel great," said Murray, who broke Matthew Stafford's school record for touchdown passes in a season. "We control our own destiny. But we've still got to win next week to get back to Atlanta."

The Bulldogs will be looking to clinch their first division title in six years and completely snuff out any talk about Mark Richt's coaching future. He was under fire after Georgia went 6-7 a year ago for its first losing season since 1996. The criticism only intensified when the Bulldogs opened this year with losses to Boise State and South Carolina.

"We came out with an edge, with a chip on our shoulder," said safety Bacarri Rambo, who returned an interception for another Georgia touchdown. "Hopefully we made a statement with this game."

Murray threw all his scoring passes by halftime, giving him 27 TDs on the season and nine in the past two weeks. He broke the school mark of 25 set by Stafford in 2008 before he was picked No. 1 overall in the NFL draft.

With 92,000-seat Sanford Stadium as loud as it's been in years, Georgia scored on four of its first five offensive possessions — the only glitch was the first of two fumbles by freshman Isaiah Crowell. Auburn fumbled right back to Georgia on the next play.

Murray threw touchdown passes of 8 yards to Tavarres King, 27 yards to Michael Bennett, 15 yards to Bruce Figgins and 25 yards to Malcolm Mitchell.

Auburn briefly tied it at 7 with a bit of trickery. Clint Moseley handed off to freshman C.J. Uzomah, who flipped a 4-yard pass to Philip Lutzenkirchen, the Georgia native's third TD catch in two years against the Bulldogs.

That was it for the Tigers, who have gone through major rebuilding pains after a perfect season with Heisman Trophy winner Cam Newton at quarterback. They have lost four SEC road games by a combined 111 points, and this was the ugliest performance yet.

"This was a complete team loss," Moseley said. "I can't pinpoint one thing or even two things. There's too many things. It was just bad."

Fortunately for Georgia, the Tigers did win one game away from Jordan-Hare Stadium — a 16-13 upset of South Carolina back on Oct. 1. That could turn out to be the difference in the SEC East.

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