Are all the pink ribbons helping to cure cancer?

Published: Friday, Nov. 11 2011 9:41 p.m. MST

With all the pink ribbons, pink football uniforms and pink products seen this fall, some may believe that breast cancer is about to be cured. Yet even with all the money being spent, researchers are no closer to a cure than they were 50 years ago.

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With all the pink ribbons, pink football uniforms and pink products seen this fall, some may believe that breast cancer is about to be cured. Yet even with all the money being spent, researchers are no closer to a cure than they were 50 years ago.

Breast cancer kills about 40,000 women each year and is the second-leading cause of death in women in the U.S., according to the American Cancer Society.

"In spite of all the money that's been raised, mortality rates are as high as they ever were," said Samantha King, author of Pink Ribbons Inc. "Women basically have the same options for treatment they had 30-40 years ago."

King has studied the Pink Campaign, the media effort to increase breast cancer awareness, for more than 15 years and has tried to explain why the search for the cure of this cancer has garnered more attention than others.

"It allows us to say the word breast out loud," King said. "It's a symbol of the breast which symbolizes motherhood."

Some view all-star athletes sporting pink for the cause as groundbreaking and heartrending. Two years ago, BYU's basketball team partnered with Nike to have an all-pink game with shoes, uniforms and basketballs with pink accents.

However the gear totaled about $6,000 (paid for by Nike) that the team would only use once. Some of the jerseys were signed and donated, but the players kept most of the equipment for themselves.

For Lori Richards, whose mom and two sisters have both survived breast cancer, said she is appreciative of the efforts because anything anyone can do or contribute to the cause is helpful.

"I think it's a good idea because there wouldn't be sports teams if their mom hadn't brought them into the world," Richards said. "Who took them to practice when they were little? Who took care of them and went to their games?"

She said that she wishes more were being done, even if that means companies are using the pink ribbon primarily for profit.

"If they make a buck, that's fine," Richards said. "As long as the awareness is getting out there."

Still, others disagree with that reasoning, like a co-founder of The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics. Stacy Malkan, author of "Not Just a Pretty Face: The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry," said some companies slap the label on the product knowing consumers will be more likely to choose that product because the consumers assume profits go to a good cause. She said some companies are employing a double-standard, claiming to raise awareness for breast cancer while continuing to use chemicals to make their products that can cause cancer.

"All of the big beauty companies that are trumpeting the pink ribbon do sell products that contribute to cancer," Malkan said.

Examples include lotions, makeup and even deodorants. She said women use around 12 beauty products per day, if those contain carcinogenic chemicals, it puts the woman at a much higher risk of developing cancer in the long-term.

Malkan said she hopes to see more companies focusing on prevention in the future and said that focus is more feasible than searching for cure.

"We've allowed that to happen," Malkan said. "In October, we get inundated with all sorts of pink ribbons from industries that are unhealthy. The pink ribbon has lost its meaning, and it's become a marketing tool. They don't tell you how much of the profits goes towards prevention."

Three-time breast cancer survivor Jan Samowitz figures that as long as some of the proceeds go toward the cause, she will buy it.

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