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Hollywood studios are embracing star-powered, faith-based films

By Susan King

Los Angeles times

Published: Friday, Oct. 14 2011 3:49 p.m. MDT

Lucas Black and star Melissa Leo in "Seven Days in Utopia."

Utopia Pictures

LOS ANGELES — In many quarters, Hollywood has long been regarded as an essentially godless place. But judging by the offerings at the movies this season, and more in the works, Tinseltown is rediscovering religion.

In the span of just a few weeks starting in late August, audiences looking for God at their local multiplex have had their choice of titles, including "Higher Ground," a chronicle of one woman's struggle with her faith; "Seven Days in Utopia," an inspirational golf drama; and "Machine Gun Preacher," about an evangelist who takes up arms in Africa.

And the onslaught isn't slowing down. "Courageous," about policemen wrestling with their faith after a tragedy, opened recently. Emilio Estevez's "The Way," about a father on a religious pilgrimage, has been released in some markets.

These films follow the success this spring of "Soul Surfer," about a Christian teen surfer's comeback after losing an arm to a shark. Released by Sony's TriStar division, the film brought in nearly $44 million at the U.S. box office.

In many cases, these movies are not filled with unknown actors; they star top performers such as Robert Duvall, Melissa Leo, Helen Hunt, Helen Mirren and Louis Gossett Jr. (all Oscar winners), plus Vera Farmiga, Martin Sheen and Gerard Butler.

So why is Hollywood looking to a higher authority?

A confluence of factors — including the economic and social difficulties facing the country in the last few years, a desire among actors and directors for interesting roles and the success of 2009's rather religious "The Blind Side" — seem to be at work.

"We are doing some serious soul-searching as a nation, trying to decide who we are going to be and what we are going to stand for," said Craig Detweiler, director of the Center of Entertainment, Media and Culture at Pepperdine University, which is affiliated with Churches of Christ. "I think that does take us back to ultimate questions, whether as filmmakers or audiences."

"Filmmakers," he added, "are understanding that spirituality can be a complicated rather than a simplifying aspect of rich drama. I think for actors, they also understand these are complex roles that are ripe for exploration. When you have Academy Award performers like Robert Duvall and Melissa Leo, these are not simple or stereotypical portraits" of Christians.

Emmy Award winner Kathy Baker appears in "Seven Days" and "Machine Gun," both times as a devout woman. Though she considers herself a spiritual person, she said she was drawn to the projects because they were both strong roles. And in the case of "Machine Gun," she had the opportunity to work with director Marc Forster. "You have this wonderful director who can do anything and you give him this great story that has to deal with international politics. It's only a coincidence to me that it's faith-based."

Baker said she believes that there are more faith-based films these days in part because religious people are eager to invest in them.

"This is a relatively new concept that different groups are funding indie films and stepping up and having the courage and the knowledge to say let's make a movie," she said. "'Seven Days in Utopia' was funded by some generous faith-based people who were very open about it. That's why it got made."

Of course, films about faith have been produced since cinema was in its infancy. Cecil B. DeMille, for example, directed numerous religious epics in the silent and sound eras, including 1927's "The King of Kings" and 1932's "The Sign of the Cross."

The 1950s were a particularly ripe time for epic religious dramas — including DeMille's "The Ten Commandments," as well as "Ben Hur" and "Quo Vadis" — plus other titles such as "Martin Luther," "The Nun's Story" and "The Robe."

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