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Charles Dharapak, File, Associated Press
FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2004, file photo, Cofer Black testifies before the House Select Committee on Homeland Security on Capitol Hill in Washington. Some foreign policy heavyweights who have joined Mitt Romney’s campaign have lobbying and business backgrounds that could shape the advice they give to the Republican candidate. Black is also a Romney special adviser and is Vice President for Global Operations at Blackbird Technologies.

WASHINGTON — Some foreign policy heavyweights who have joined Mitt Romney's campaign have lobbying and business backgrounds that could shape the advice they give to the Republican candidate.

Their interests include lobbying against cuts in U.S. aid to Pakistan and ties to defense companies with government contracts for cybersecurity, Navy shipbuilding and a ballistic missile shield — all issues that Romney has cited in recent speeches. One adviser works for a German bank that has promoted cap-and-trade programs to reduce pollution, which Romney said he now opposes.

Critics urge more transparency about such advisers, but the Romney campaign says it will rely on the candidate's judgment in scrutinizing policy advice.