GOP seizes on waning campus Obamamania

By Martha Irvine

Associated Press

Published: Saturday, Sept. 17 2011 11:08 p.m. MDT

In this May 12, 2008 file photo, young supporters cheering for Democratic presidential hopeful, Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., at a rally in Louisville, Ky. Political experts and youth themselves now say they've seen a marked drop in "Obamamania" on college campuses and elsewhere since the election.

Associated Press

Enlarge photo»

CHICAGO — The young people in the ad look dissatisfied. Barack Obama's voice and the words "winning the future," from one of his old campaign speeches, echo in the background.

"You're LOSING my future," says one young man.

The ad, which has aired during sportscasts, reality TV shows and late-night comedy programs popular with younger people, was produced for the College Republican National Committee. It is an attempt to play on the fears that haunt college students, that they won't find jobs and will be living with less than their parents did.

Their fears aren't exclusive to their generation. But given that it seems to taken hold in a voting bloc that helped elect Obama with a wave of hope and change, there could be an opening for Republicans, unless the president can find a way to get young people fired up again.

"People are taking out $100,000 in debt and they're graduating next year," says Nick Haschka, a 25-year-old MBA student at Northwestern University.

Haschka voted for Obama in 2008 and remains a strong supporter. "I think he's doing the best he can in these circumstances," he says.

He knows others have been less patient.

That's been confirmed by recent polls, which show that young voters' support for the president is waning. It's true even on campuses like Northwestern, one of many where Obamamania began to take hold four years ago, when young voters supported the president by a 2-1 margin.

"I don't really think he can make a difference now," says Charlotte Frei, a 24-year-old doctoral student at Northwestern who's studying transportation engineering. She voted for the president in 2008 and will probably do so again, though she's not very enthusiastic about it.

Others worry that apathy could cause a lot of young voters to sit this one out.

"It's unfortunate — but I think the last election was an exception," says Aubrey Blanche, a senior at Northwestern. She soon will graduate with a degree in journalism and political science. Like many others, she has "no idea" where she'll get a job.

Young Republicans see an opportunity.

Even at the University of Chicago, a short walk from the Obamas' home in Hyde Park, members of the small local chapter of College Republicans are feeling empowered to engage students in conversation as the fall term begins.

"The jobs issue is a major accelerant," says Jacob Rabinowitz, a sophomore who is the group's vice president.

In a recruiting video, Zach Howell, the outgoing chairman of the national College Republican group, says his party offers "real change" and "hope," playing off the themes of Obama's last campaign.

The group's ads are edgy and catchy — and a good start, says political scientist Richard Niemi.

"Throwing back a candidate's words at him or her is a tried-and-true method," says Niemi, a professor at the University of Rochester in New York. "But you've got to have the candidate to go with it."

That's where it gets tricky for Republicans because young voters traditionally have leaned heavily Democratic.

In the 2012 race so far, Texas Rep. Ron Paul, with his libertarian leanings, is among those with a small but loyal legion of young followers. Jon Huntsman, the former Utah governor, has attempted to make a play for young supporters, calling them "Generation H."

Jacob Engels, a 19-year-old business student at Valencia College in Florida who is a delegate in the Republican straw poll later this month, is a Huntsman supporter. Though Huntsman hasn't made a strong showing in early polls, Engels calls him the "pragmatic choice" because he's less conservative on issues such as the environment and gay marriage.

That would make Huntsman more palatable to his college peers, he says.

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