This day in sports history

By Compiled By Paul Montella

Associated Press

Published: Friday, Aug. 26 2011 10:16 p.m. MDT

1993 — Brandie Burton's 20-foot birdie putt on the first hole of a sudden-death playoff edges Betsy King for the du Maurier Classic title, the LPGA tour's final major of the season.

1998 — Toms River, N.J., wins its first Little League World Series with a 12-9 victory over Kashima, Japan. Chris Cardone hits home runs in consecutive at-bats — including the game-deciding two-run shot.

2000 — Second-seeded Gustavo Kuerten, the reigning French Open king, is beaten 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (1) by qualifier Wayne Arthurs in the U.S. Open. Kuerten is the second No. 2 seed to be eliminated in the first round since 1956.

2000 — Anaheim's Darin Erstad goes 3-for-5 to reach 200 hits faster than any player in 65 years as the Angels beat Toronto 9-4.

2002 — Mark Bellhorn becomes the first player in NL history to hit a home run in the same inning from both sides of the plate. The homers come in the fourth of the Chicago Cubs' 13-10 win over Milwaukee.

2005 — Russian Svetlana Kuznetsova becomes the first U.S. Open defending women's champion to fall in the first round, losing 6-3, 6-2 to fellow Russian Ekaterina Bychkova on the first day of the U.S. Open.

2007 — Bernard Lagat, an American citizen since 2004, is the first U.S. runner to win a world 1,500-meter championship. No American had won an Olympic gold medal in the event since Mel Sheppard in 1908.

2010 — Kenya's David Rudisha sets a world record in the 800 meters for the second time in a week at the Rieti Grand Prix. Rudisha clocks 1:41.01 in the two-lap race, shaving 0.08 seconds off the mark he set last weekend in Berlin.

2010 — The Little League aces from Japan end the United States' five-year reign as World Series champions. The team from Tokyo limit Waipahu, Hawaii, to four singles, and get a homer and three RBIs from Konan Tomori to take the Little League World Series title with a 4-1 victory.

Aug. 30

1926 — Guy McKinney, driven by Nat Ray, wins the first Hambletonian Stakes.

1937 — Joe Louis wins a 15-round unanimous decision over Tommy Farr at Yankee Stadium in the first defense of his heavyweight title.

1961 — Harlan Dean, driven by Jimmy Arthur, wins the Hambletonian Stakes and sets a record for combined time in the two heats at 3:57 2-5.

1981 — Bill Shoemaker becomes the first jockey to win a $1 million race when he rode John Henry to a nose victory over The Bart in the inaugural Arlington Million at Arlington Park.

1986 — Dawn Patrol and Falcon Bret record the fastest dead heat at Roosevelt Raceway at 1:58.1.

1987 — Ben Johnson of Canada sets the world record in the 100 meters bettering Calvin Smith's 4-year-old mark of 9.93 by 0.10 seconds in the World Track and Field Championships in Rome. Johnson later lost the record because of steroid use.

1991 — Mike Powell smashes Bob Beamon's world long jump record with a leap of 29 feet, 4½ inches, two inches beyond the record, in the World Track and Field Championships in Tokyo. The leap also ends Carl Lewis' 10-year, 65-meet winning streak.

2001 — Ashley Martin becomes the first woman to play in a Division I football game, kicking three extra points without a miss to help I-AA Jacksonville State hand Cumberland its 18th straight loss, 71-10.

2005 — Andy Roddick has a shocking first-round exit from the U.S. Open against Gilles Muller, a player making his debut in the tournament. Roddick, the champion two years earlier and the No. 4 seed this year, falls 7-6 (4), 7-6 (8), 7-6 (1) on his 23rd birthday to the first man from Luxembourg to compete in the Open.

2006 — Curt Schilling becomes the 14th pitcher in major league history to reach 3,000 strikeouts when he fans Oakland's Nick Swisher in the first inning of the Red Sox's 7-2 loss to Oakland.

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