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A chronology of Steve Jobs at Apple

Associated Press

Published: Wednesday, Aug. 24 2011 7:50 p.m. MDT

FILE - In this June 7, 2010 file photo, Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds the new iPhone 4 during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco. Apple Inc. on Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011 said Jobs is resigning as CEO, effective immediately. He will be replaced by Tim Cook, who was the company's chief operating officer. It said Jobs has been elected as Apple's chairman.

Paul Sakuma, File, Associated Press

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Some key dates from the life and work of Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Inc., who resigned Wednesday as CEO.

1955: Stephen Paul Jobs is born on Feb. 24.

1972: Jobs enrolls in Reed College in Portland, Ore. but drops out after a semester.

1974: Jobs works for video game maker Atari and attends meetings of the Homebrew Computer Club with Steve Wozniak, a high school friend who was a few years older.

1976: Apple Computer is formed on April Fools' Day, shortly after Wozniak and Jobs create a new computer circuit board in a Silicon Valley garage. The Apple I computer goes on sale by the summer for $666.66.

1977: Apple is incorporated by its founders and a group of venture capitalists. It unveils Apple II, the first personal computer to generate color graphics. Sales soar to the rate of $1 million a year.

1978: Jobs' daughter Lisa is born to girlfriend Chrisann Brennan.

1979: Jobs visits Xerox PARC and is inspired by a computer with a graphical user interface.

1980: Apple goes public, raising $110 million in one of the biggest initial public offerings to date.

1982: Annual sales climb to $1 billion.

1983: The Lisa computer goes on sale with much fanfare, only to be pulled two years later. Steve Jobs lures John Sculley away from Pepsico Inc. to serve as Apple's CEO.

1984: Iconic "1984" Macintosh commercial directed by Ridley Scott shows during the Super Bowl. The Macintosh computer goes on sale.

1985: Jobs and Sculley clash, leading to Jobs' resignation. Wozniak also resigns from Apple.

1986: Jobs founds Next Inc., a new computer company making high-end machines for universities. He also buys Pixar from "Star Wars" creator George Lucas for $10 million.

1989: First NeXT computer goes on sale with a $6,500 price tag.

1991: Apple and IBM Corp. announce an alliance to develop new PC microprocessors and software. Apple unveils PowerBook portable Macintoshes.

1993: Apple introduces the Newton, a hand-held, pen-based computer. The company reports quarterly loss of $188 million in July, and CEO Sculley is replaced by Apple president Michael Spindler. Apple restructures and Sculley resigns as chairman. At Next, Jobs decides to focus on software instead of whole computers.

1994: Apple introduces Power Macintosh computers based on the PowerPC chip it developed with IBM and Motorola. Apple decides to license its operating software, allowing other companies to clone the Mac.

1995: The first Mac clones go on sale. Microsoft Corp. releases Windows 95, which is easier to use and more like the Macintosh. Apple struggles with competition, parts shortages and mistakes predicting customer demand. Pixar's "Toy Story," the first commercial computer-animated feature, hits theaters and Pixar goes to Wall Street with an IPO that raises $140 million.

1996: Apple buys Next for $430 million, for the operating system Jobs' team developed. Gil Amelio replaces Spindler as CEO.

1997: Steve Jobs returns to Apple as an adviser, then "de facto head" of company; Amelio is pushed out. Jobs puts an end to Mac clones.

1998: Apple returns to profitability and unveils the iMac, a blue-and-white computer and monitor in one that set Apple on the path to its comeback. Apple also discontinues the Newton.

2000: Jobs is named CEO of Apple.

2001: The first iPod goes on sale, as do computers with OS X, the modern Mac operating system based on Next software.

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