Quantcast

English, U.S. Mormons join forces to create 'Faith'

Published: Wednesday, Aug. 3 2011 10:14 p.m. MDT

Actors from the Cheltenham England Stake portray the pioneering Oakey family in "Faith the Musical" at the LDS Conference Center.

Brian Grimmett, for the Deseret News

SALT LAKE CITY — In a unique intercontinental mingling of talent and faith, the Cheltenham England Stake and the South Jordan Utah Glenmoor Stake are joining forces to present "Faith the Musical" at the LDS Conference Center Little Theater.

The production opens tonight at 7:30 p.m, with additional performances scheduled Friday and Saturday and again Aug. 9-13 at 7:30 p.m. each evening. There will also be a 2 p.m. matinee Saturday.

The musical is the brainchild of David R. Markham, who, as a member of the Cheltenham Stake high council, volunteered to write a musical to commemorate the stake's 25th anniversary in 2007. Markham drew in part from "Truth Will Prevail," a previous musical he had written in 1987 — just two years after he and his family joined the LDS Church — in observance of the 150th anniversary of the church in Great Britain.

"Sometimes things can be communicated in a theatrical setting that can't be communicated any other way," said Markham, a professional musician who wrote the book, lyrics and music for this production. "The history of the church in England is rich with stories of faith and courage. The challenge we face is trying to create a real feeling of what those early Saints went through because of their faith, and the blessing of the angels who I truly believe helped them along the way."

"Faith the Musical" focuses on the real-life story of Thomas Oakey and his family, who were baptized by Mormon missionary and future LDS Church President Wilford Woodruff in 1840 at Benbow's Pond near Ledbury, England. Drawing almost exclusively from pioneer journals, the story follows the family's journey of faith from Great Britain to America, and then across America via handcart to join the body of the church in the Salt Lake Valley.

"We've taken great care to make sure the script is as historically accurate as it can possibly be," said Gresha Carmichael, Markham's daughter and production assistant. "When we did the musical in England in 2007, the script included a fictional family. But for the Salt Lake City production the church insisted that we remove the fictional family and make it real.

"Ninety percent of the dialogue is word-for-word from pioneer journals," she continued, adding that the church allowed for "a bit of license" with one of the script's romantic elements.

"It's as factual as we can make it," she said.

That same spirit of authenticity will also be heard onstage through the accents of the various actors. "No one onstage is faking an accent," Carmichael said, smiling. "The characters from England are being played by actors from England, and the American characters are being played by actors with lovely American accents. It adds to the feeling of reality, I think."

While it is true that staging "Faith the Musical" with a cast that is partly from one continent and partly from another adds delightfully to the show's authentic feeling, it is likewise true that it adds significantly to the degree of difficulty.

"I've spent a lot of time on my knees during the past four years," Markham said, referring to the four-year period between the original performances of "Faith the Musical" in England and its current Salt Lake City run.

"It was a long and careful process, with a series of what I call 'mini-miracles' all along the way. But Heavenly Father answers prayers, and here we are!"

The decision to integrate casts from the U.K and the U.S. to form one cast was born mostly of necessity. "We knew we wouldn't be able to bring our entire cast and crew over," Carmichael said. "As much as we would have loved to, we knew it would be too great of a sacrifice of time and money for many people. So we knew we would need help to successfully stage the musical here."

Get The Deseret News Everywhere

Subscribe

Mobile

RSS