Quantcast

Arab Spring drifts into summer stalemates

By Brian Murphy

Associated Press

Published: Thursday, July 14 2011 7:26 a.m. MDT

FILE - In this Wednesday, July 6, 2011 file photo, a rebel with a bicycle celebrates the liberation of al-Qawalish, 100 kilometers (60 miles) southwest of Tripoli, Libya, after six hours of battle. In the background smoke rises from a the power station that was shelled by retreating soldiers loyal to Moammar Gadhafi. What appeared an unstoppable groundswell for change across the Middle East earlier this year, has splintered into scattered and indecisive conflicts that have left thousands dead and Western policy makers juggling roles ranging from NATO airstrikes in Libya to worried bystanders in Syria and Yemen.

Gaia Anderson, File, Associated Press

CAIRO — Among the protest banners in Cairo's Tahrir Square was a hand-drawn map of the Arab Spring with black target symbols covering each country hit by anti-government uprisings since the leaders of Tunisia and Egypt were ousted earlier this year.

But the bull's-eyes could easily be replaced with question marks as the groundswell for change has splintered into scattered and indecisive conflicts that have left thousands dead and Western policymakers juggling roles from NATO airstrikes in Libya to worried bystanders in Syria and Yemen.

The stalemates could shift into a deeper holding pattern in August during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, when the pace of daily life traditionally slows as the Islamic world observes a dawn-to-dusk fast and other customs such as temporary truces.

It's a huge and traumatic undertaking to shove aside regimes with decades in power — and sway over nearly every decision down to who gets hired as street sweeper. Iran did it with the 1979 Islamic Revolution, and the American-led invasion to topple Saddam Hussein cleaned the slate for Iraq and ushered in years of near civil war.

But no such wholesale change appears in the pipeline with the present revolts. That has raised concern that even if the leaders fall, the pillars of the regimes could survive, as happened when military rulers took temporary control after Egypt's Hosni Mubarak stepped down.

"Half revolution doesn't work," a headline last week in Egypt's Al-Ahram Al-Massai newspaper said after demonstrators returned to Tahrir Square to press for swifter political reforms and bolder legal action against officials from Mubarak's regime who were accused of corruption and killing protesters.

But even a halfway mark appears farther along than most of the rebellions against the Mideast's old guard.

A core of loyal security forces in Yemen and Syria keep the regimes hanging on despite relentless protests. In Libya, Moammar Gadhafi could face a moment of truth as rebels press closer to the capital Tripoli and NATO warplanes hammer military sites, yet the anti-Gadhafi militias have no clear leader to prevent possible power grabs to control the country's oil riches if he is ousted.

The country where the Arab Spring began, Tunisia, has been shaken by unrest — including a rise in ultraconservative Islamists — ahead of planned elections in October to elect an assembly that will write a new constitution. Some political groups are urging further delays in the election to give new parties a chance to organize.

Egypt, meanwhile, is questioning when — or if — the ruling military council will surrender power. The caretaker rulers effectively announced a delay of the elections on Tuesday when they said preparations for the vote would start Sept. 30.

"Bring down the military junta," chanted some of the 30,000 protesters Tuesday in Tahrir Square. Hours later, the military made clear its patience was wearing thin — with Maj. Gen. Mohsen el-Fangari wagging his finger and warning protesters against "harming national interests."

Only in tiny Bahrain have authorities apparently tipped the scales clearly in their favor. Security forces — aided by Saudi-led reinforcements — smothered an uprising by the kingdom's majority Shiites seeking greater rights from the Sunni rulers. A so-called "national dialogue" began this month, but it's unlikely that the 200-year-old ruling dynasty will give up any significant hold on power and may need a heavy hand to keep Shiite-led protests from reigniting.

"It's not over, but we are in an ugly situation now," said Christopher Davidson, a lecturer on Middle East and Gulf affairs at Britain's Durham University.

Get The Deseret News Everywhere

Subscribe

Mobile

RSS