MEMPHIS, Tenn. — David Mathis is leading a PGA Tour event for the first time, and pressure is not one of his concerns.

His focus is on three more days of golf.

Mathis matched his best round ever on the PGA Tour, shooting a 5-under 65 Thursday to grab the lead at the St. Jude Classic. The 37-year-old North Carolina native is only in his second year on the PGA Tour and had to play his way back by finishing 13th on the Nationwide Tour money list last year.

He jumped to the top of the leaderboard late in the first round, finishing with six birdies and one late bogey. He hadn't shot 65 on tour since 2009 when he went that low three different times.

"I don't feel stressed or uncomfortable in the position," Mathis said. "I know there's tons of golf left. I'm just trying to keep poise about me I guess I would say while I play and recognize that, 'Hey, there's lots of holes to play between now and Sunday,' and so just take it for what it is. Be thankful for a good round and try to reproduce it for the next three days."

Robert Karlsson, who lost a four-hole playoff here a year ago, shot a 66 and was tied with John Merrick, Kris Blanks, Colt Knost and Kevin Kisner. Knost had the only bogey-free round of the day.

Keegan Bradley and Fabian Gomez each had 67s. Bradley is among the few here who could play their way into the U.S. Open by winning at the TPC Southwind for a second tour victory since the last Open. Bradley won the Byron Nelson Championship two weeks ago.

Retief Goosen and Boo Weekley were among a group with 68s. Defending champion Lee Westwood opened with a 69.

Mathis turned pro in 1997 after leaving Campbell University. He started playing mini tours and was on the Canadian tour before switching to the Nationwide circuit. He first joined the PGA Tour in 2009 when he posted a pair of top-25 finishes, including a tie for 23rd in Memphis.

But he wound up back on the Nationwide Tour last year. St. Jude, sponsored by FedEx, is his 14th event on the PGA Tour this year and No. 45 for his career.

"Somebody asked me the other day, 'How long you been playing? Like 13 years or something like that?' I was like, 'Really?" Mathis said. "So anyway obviously the time flies, but you know it's been an enjoyable ride coming from that ... makes me appreciate playing out here for sure."

Mathis, who is from Winston-Salem, N.C., credited a visit with his coach Patrick Kelley this week for helping straighten out his line when putting. He noticed the difference almost immediately when he started on the back nine and rolled in a 9-footer to save par.

"That just kind of jump-started my day and you know just had some confidence," Mathis said. "I was driving the ball in the fairway and hitting irons in spots I was looking to hit them and you know just added up to a 65 thankfully."

He made a birdie putt on the par-3 No. 11 from just inside 19 feet, plus 8-footers for birdies on Nos. 13 and 16. He converted a 15-footer for birdie on No. 2 to join the pack tied at 4 under.

Mathis had the lead to himself when he hit a wedge on the par-5 No. 3 to within 13 feet, then made another birdie. He padded his advantage with a four-footer on No. 5 for his sixth birdie.

His lone bogey came on No. 8, when he three-putted from within 8 feet.

Karlsson started off the front nine with three birdies on his first six holes. But the Swede hit his tee shot on the par-4 No. 13 into a fairway bunker and wound up bogeying the hole to fall back to 2 under.

He got the stroke back with a birdie on the par-3 No. 14, rolling in from 18 feet. He also had a 19-footer for birdie on No. 15, but came up a couple feet short.

Merrick has made six of eight cuts this year, with his best finish a tie for 11th at Puerto Rico. He took advantage of an early tee time to take the early clubhouse lead.

He said the key Thursday was hitting shots closer to the hole.

"It's definitely been something that's been hurting me," he said. "I've been hitting greens but not really getting it close. Today I hit some good shots and had some decent looks at birdies that were inside 10 feet."

Kisner is a rookie in his 13th event on tour this season. He started this tournament with only his fourth round in the 60s this year, taking advantage of a morning tee time with little wind. The South Carolina native who went to the University of Georgia hasn't finished better than a tie for 39th, and Kisner said his biggest challenge is learning the courses.

"The courses are much more difficult than the Nationwide," he said. "You really have to know where you're going to miss it and places to be. It's all just part of learning. It's why they call you a rookie."

DIVOTS: Sergio Garcia may have a chance for an early arrival at Congressional. He opened with a 78 that featured an 11 on the par-5 No. 3. Garcia was 2 over for the back nine before hitting three times into the water running along much of the right side of the third fairway. He hit his ninth shot into a greenside bunker before blasting out to within 3 feet and finally sunk that putt for his 11. ... J.B. Holmes did not start.

USGA HIRES BODENHAMER: Former BYU golfer John Bodenhamer has joined the United States Golf Association (USGA) as the senior managing director of Rules, Competitions & Amateur Status.

The 49-year-old Bodenhamer is a native of Washington, who played for BYU in the early 1980s under coach Karl Tucker. He has served as the CEO and executive director of the Pacific Northwest Golf Association since 1990, the CEO and executive director of the Washington State Golf Association since 1992, and executive director of the Pacific Coast Golf Association since 1998.

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The new position will include oversight of the competition side of the USGA's national championships. Bodenhamer will report to USGA Executive Director Mike Davis and will work very closely with USGA Managing Director of Rules & Competitions Jeff Hall.

OPEN WON'T HAVE LOCAL FLAVOR: In sectional qualifying tournaments earlier this week, golfers with Utah ties were unsuccessful in their bids to play in next week's U.S. Open

The biggest name to miss was Mike Weir, the longtime Utah resident, who had rounds of 77 and 75 at Columbus, Ohio to miss by a whopping 15 strokes. This will mark the first time since 1999 that the former Masters champion will not play in one of the four majors.

Farmington's Daniel Summerhays, a PGA Tour regular this year, came the closest to qualifying, missing by three shots at Memphis. Other Utahns who missed qualifying were Joseph Summerhays, Luke Swilor, Zac Blair, Clay Ogden and Zach Johnson.