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The Media Equation: How Drudge has stayed on top

By David Carr

New York Times News Service

Published: Sunday, May 15 2011 7:36 p.m. MDT

For most big news websites, about 60 percent of the traffic is homegrown, people who come directly to the site by dint of a bookmark or typing in www.latimes.com or www.huffingtonpost.com. The other critical 40 percent comes by referrals, the links that are the source of drive-by traffic, new readers and heat-seekers on a particular story.

By far, most of the traffic from links comes from the sprawling hybrid of Google search and news, which provides about 30 percent of the visits to news sites, according to a report released last week by the Project for Excellence in Journalism, part of the Pew Research Center. And the second? Has to be Facebook, right? Nope. Then Twitter must be the next in line. Except it isn't.

Give up? It's The Drudge Report, a 14-year-old site — a relic by Web standards — conceived and operated by Matt Drudge. Using data from the Nielsen Co. to examine the top 21 news sites on the Web, the report suggests that Drudge, once thought of as a hothouse flower of the Lewinsky scandal, is now more powerful in driving news than the half-billion folks on Facebook. (According to the study, Facebook accounted for 3.3 percent of the referrals to news sites, less than half as many as generated by The Drudge Report.)

"When you look at his influence, it cuts across all kind of sites, both traditional news outlets and online-only sites," said Amy S. Mitchell, the deputy director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism and one of the authors of the study. "He was an early and powerful force in setting the news agenda and has somehow maintained that even as there has been a great deal of change in the way people get their news."

With no video, no search optimization, no slide shows, and a design that is right out of mid-'90s manual on HTML, The Drudge Report provides 7 percent of the inbound referrals to the top news sites in the country. "It's a real achievement," said John F. Harris, the co-founder of Politico. "I covered the Clinton White House in 1997 and 1998 and I would never have conceived that he would be an important player in the landscape 12 years later. He does one thing and he does it particularly well. The power of it comes from the community of people that read it: operatives, bookers, reporters, producers and politicians."

So in a news age when the next big thing changes as often as the weather, how can a guy who broke through on the Web before there was broadband still set the agenda? How can that be?

His durability is, first and foremost, a personal achievement, a testament to the fact that he is, as Gabriel Snyder, who has done Web news for Gawker, Newsweek and now The Atlantic, told me, "the best wire editor on the planet. He can look into a huge stream of news, find the hot story and put an irresistible headline on it."

On Thursday, a fairly straightforward Reuters article about a NATO attack on Moammar Gadhafi's compound occupied the skyline of the site with a particularly odious picture of the strongman girded by a headline that blared, "NEXT UP: NATO GOING FOR THE KILL." Underneath, there were tons of links, news and pictures (Drudge has a real knack for photo editing) with all kinds of irresistible marginalia: "Desperate Americans Buy Kidneys from Peru Poor" was just above an article about what a prolific emailer Osama bin Laden was in spite of his lack of access to the Internet.

Yes, Drudge is a conservative ideologue whose site also serves as a crib sheet for the likes of Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity. But if you believe that his huge traffic numbers are a byproduct of an ideologically motivated readership, consider that 15 percent of the traffic at WashingtonPost.com, which is not exactly a hotbed of Tea Party foment, comes from The Drudge Report.

It is, in its own way, a kind of utility, with stable traffic of about 12 million to 14 million unique visitors every month no matter what kind of news is breaking. Everyone goes there because, well, everyone else goes there.

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