President Barack Obama's announcement of Osama bin Laden's death spread through the world like wildfire Sunday night.

The New York Times posted an obituary of bin Laden, calling him, "The most wanted face of terrorism."

Al Jazeera reported on U.S. celebrations at the news and indicated that Afghan officials said bin Laden's killing was a "symbolic victory."

An ABC News blog featured statements from former presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. The latter called the operation "a 'momentous achievement' that 'marks a victory for America, for people who seek peace around the world, and for all those who lost loved ones on September 11, 2001.' "

Featuring a picture of the World Trade Center towers on fire on Sept. 11, 2011, with bin Laden superimposed in the corner, The Australian had the headline "Osama bin Laden hunted down and killed by US."

The Telegraph featured a picture of a smiling bin Laden and the simple headline "Osama bin Laden killed in Pakistan."

The Globe and Mail in Canada led with the headline, "U.S.-led operation killed Osama bin Laden, Obama says."

Meanwhile, stuff.co.nz provided a detailed look at the nine-year chase for bin Laden.

"Osama bin Laden put 'holy war' on global agenda" was the headline for the news on Mysinchew.com.

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The Sydney Morning Herald reported on possible economic impacts of bin Laden's killing, under the headline "Dollar rises on reports Osama bin Laden is dead." The Herald also reported that bin Laden's demise led to a drop in oil prices. Business Week wrote about a rise in S&P 500 futures.

The Boston Herald reported on celebrations by family members of 9/11 victims. USA Today also posted reactions from politicians and others to the news.

Social media played a major role in spreading the news of bin Laden's death. The Atlantic specifically mentioned Twitter's role in informing people. Several Facebook pages dedicated to victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks also included messages from people celebrating the death of bin Laden

Finally, Entertainment Weekly focused on the fact that President Obama's speech interrupted prime-time television with its headline.